IRMINSUL :


The meaning of the Irminsul symbol

Irminsul is a pure and ancient Germanic symbol. The name Irminsul is of Old Saxon origin meaning “arising pillar”, or "great pillar that supports”. The concept of Irminsul and its iconic, unique shape is found within the most ancient pure Germanic languages and history, from Sweden to Switzerland, amongst only our extraordinary Germanic folk, from Angles and Saxons to Geats and Goths alike. Irminsul is a symbol that belongs to the Germanic folk ourselves, drawn out of inspiration from our most ancient sagas and ancestral spiritual ideals encoded into the unique iconography demonstrated here. Its true meaning is illustrative, deeply spiritual and truly folkish.

  • The Irmin component of the name is an Old Saxon adjective that transliterates as “colossal strength” or “Great/strong ”. Irminsul in its literal interpretation potentially refers to the Germanic spiritual concept of spiritual pillars, Irminsuls which are pillars that were used as totems, or statues of worship in the classic shape.
  • The name Irmin potentially refers to one of the alternate regional Old Saxon names for Tyr or more realistically with Woden/Wotan/Odin. As ithe Old Norse attested equivalent of Irmin is Jörmunr which is a name/title ascribed to Woden/Wotan/Odin.
  • It should be noted that through Old Norse alone over 220 names of deities have been attributed to different aspects or titles for Odin alone, such as Grim, Hárr, Gondlir and Jörmunr. Factor in all the Old English, Old German and regional variations, the names of Odin must over our entire history have numbered into the thousands.
  • Or Irminsul is alternatively of the tribal Gods specifically created by the specific German tribes that share Irmin in their name, which could additionally simply be their name for Wotan/Woden/Odin.
  • Irminsul refers also to Yggdrasil through this connection to Irmin/Jörmunr who is also consistently attested to as being represented by the name Yggr, which forms an integral component of Yggdrasil, which acctually means “Yggr’s steed”, from which Yggr(Woden) hung himself from for nine nights to obtain the Runes.

The Irminsul shape was also carved from a central pillar in some designs of Norwegian, Swedish and Danish longboat. Irminsul is a noble icon integral to the core of our ancestral spirituality, for what it represents via the stories of our Gods and Goddesses, primarily through the Æsir, our ancestors who were our divine progenitors.

It is through this that Irminsul can be seen as a symbol of this ancient Germanic symbolism and legacy, of sacrifice for greater knowledge and self-improvement. Irminsul plays a considerably important symbolic role in being a focal point of Germanic spiritual worship, as proven by the existence of Irminsul totems, like that of the Saxons, which was destroyed by genocidal, anti-Germanic Celtic-Christians (Charlemagne).

Irminsul today for us Germanic folk carries not only the legacy of improvement, hope, knowledge, wisdom and a memory symbol to remind us of our oldest ancestors but also Irminsul reminds us of our eternal state of war against our enemies and our struggle to improve our folk and our individual selves in the face of outside groups intent on destroying, downgrading and defiling our sacred spirits and fundamental Germanic ethnic natures, Irminsul as a symbol lives on in us. Multiple folkish Asatro groups have heartwarmingly adopted their names through variants of Irminsul worldwide, in all Germanic nations, a defiant symbol of our defiant and extraordinary heritage as Germanic folk, from Angles and Saxons to Geats and Goths, sons and daughters of the Æsir, and Irminsul recounts that pure and ancient heritage of ethnic nobility.

Irminsul carries and invokes both the memories of our oldest ancestors and our dreams for our future, in proud defiance of those who tore down the Saxon Irminsul, in thier name we Asatro folk today shall raise a thousand more Irminsuls, like seeds from a tree, that have blown far and wide, that shall grow in vengeance of their fallen Irminsul, the symbolic tree that lies at the heart of so much of what we call Asatro today.

Irminsul conveys to us the greatest and most sincere symbolic memories of who we are as a folk, the sophisticated and ancient intricacies of our ancestral lore, our memories as Germanic folk. Irminsul not only symbolically represents all that has been stated here but through Wotan’s/Woden’s/Odin’s example of hanging himself for nine days upon Yggdrasil, Irminsul as both a symbol of that saga and of Yggdrasil literally implores us to an ethos identical to that of Odin or in this role Yggr. That one of our Gods tortured himself in the void beaneath Yggdrasil and attained for our people the gift of the Runes, we too must never be afraid nor reluctant to make similar, or greater sacrifices and endeavours on behalf of our people.

This is the message we can draw from Irminsul, from a great symbol of our Germanic spirituality and it is a message of purity that is more important today than ever before.

Irminsul in its entirety is a creation of a pure Germanic language and people, that this name is known to us in Old Saxon demonstrates it is an integral symbolic and literal aspect of our ancestral Germanic spiritual and sacred racial history. Thus Irminsul is a symbol that we must carry upon our minds and within our hearts today and always.